Felons in the White House?

Redemption is possible for anyone — even the odious Benedict Arlen Specter, who makes this constructive remark about the simmering White House job-bribing scandal most of the press has been studiously ignoring:

There’s a crime called misprision of a felony. Misprision of a felony is when you don’t report a crime. So you’re getting into pretty deep areas here in these considerations.

Sphincter is referring to the jobs that were offered by the White House as highly illegal bribes to Democrats Joe Sestak and Andrew Romanoff for getting out of the way of favored Senate candidates Specter in Pennsylvania and Michael Bennet in Colorado. As the American Spectator explains in a story worth reading just for the URL, this means that anyone who knows about the proffered bribes and stayed quiet could be headed to prison on felony charges:

Stunningly, this would presumably also include anyone on the Obama White House staff who knew one of their colleagues had offered such a job — which is to say committed a crime — and didn’t report it. …

It should be recalled here that Specter is not just Sestak’s opponent. He is a former Philadelphia district attorney and chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee. …

If in fact Sestak is telling the truth, if in fact the Denver Post story about Andrew Romanoff is correct — and neither Sestak nor Romanoff reported these offers to federal authorities — Specter is saying both could in fact do jail time for committing a felony.

This may explain why Robert Gibbs has been doggedly stonewalling questions on the topic by two of the last real journalists in Washington, Major Garrett and Jake Tapper.

If Sestak has told the truth, if the Denver Post got it right — then not only is the person or persons within the White House who made these job offers in big trouble, but anybody else on the Obama White House staff who currently knows this has happened and has not reported it to the proper authorities — the FBI, just for starters — is, according to Specter, a potential prosecution target for “misprision of a felony.” For which this person or persons could also go to jail along with whomever offered the jobs in the first place.

Good thing they don’t still wear those black and white horizontal stripes at the Big House. Beltway Bob wouldn’t look good in them.

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Beltway Bob would prefer for the press to keep still about the bribes.

On tips from TrickleUpPolitics and the Knights of the Dumb Table at Blue Gold Nation. Cross-posted at Moonbattery.

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