Hey, Here’s How To Talk About “Climate Change” At Thanksgiving

Of course, when you, the Warmist, start yammering on about Hotcoldwetdry, I would hope you are not actually eating turkey, because turkey itself is bad for “climate change”. In fact, most food causes “climate change” through various means, including the veggies, so, you shouldn’t eat anything. Ever. Just being a human is bad for “climate change”

How to Talk About Climate Change at Thanksgiving: Recipes for Good Conversations

Or, just a good way to get uninvited next year.

I know many families ban political discussions around the dinner table. While that’s not how I grew up, I understand why people want to avoid raised voices and hurt feelings, especially while they’re digging into stuffing. Unfortunately, many people would consider a discussion about climate change political, too. That sentiment can create a spiral of silence, according to George Marshall, who wrote a masterful guide to how we talk about climate change.

So if you care about climate issues, should you march into Thanksgiving dinner with some graphs, charts, and talking points? I sure hope not. For one thing, those aren’t edible (except pie charts, which are delicious). But even if you’re not trying to talk about climate change, it can and does come up.

Of course, if you manage to get involved in a heated discussion, here are your talking points

Course one: serve up questions, not arguments

If someone tells you the Earth isn’t really warming, it’s an invitation to argue about temperature data and scientific authority. Further, some folks who don’t accept the science can raise a surprisingly large number of misleading points because there’s so much misinformation out there from which to draw.

Scientific authority equals consensus, which is not science. But, the author is right, there is a lot of misinformation out there, emanating from Believer scientists and policy wonks. Anyhow, temperature increases do not prove anthropogenic causation.

Course two: served by people who share someone’s values

In his forthcoming book from Stanford University Press, How Culture Shapes the Climate Debate, the University of Michigan’s Andrew Hoffman argues that we can easily get caught up in the culture war when we talk about climate change. “Certainly, Al Gore and Rush Limbaugh evoke visceral responses from individuals on either side of the political divide while also resonating strongly with those who agree with their ideology,” Hoffman writes. “But individuals with credibility on both sides of the debate can act as ‘climate brokers.’”

Hoffman recommends pointing to people who share an audience’s values when it comes to climate and energy issues.

For instance, some people are uncomfortable with climate change because it feels like it’s in conflict with their religious views. You can point them to researchers like Katharine Hayhoe and religious leaders like Richard Cizik.

Say what? Most won’t even know who they are, and those who do will understand that they are full of mule fritters.

Course three: clear the table and bring the solutions

After you’ve tried the steps above, a discussion might still devolve into an argument. The good news is, you can always talk about solutions.

Unsurprisingly, the article fails to mention what those solutions are, because the minute they are brought up for discussing it’s clearly understood that said solutions are all about pushing Progressive (nice fascist) policies, like redistribution and government control of citizen’s lives.

After this comes “pie”, whereby the Warmists should send emails and Facebook posts, annoying their friends and relatives. All while refusing to practice what they preach.

Crossed at Pirate’s Cove. Follow me on Twitter @WilliamTeach.

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