Poll: Donald Trump Seen As Most Electable

What this poll really shows is that Republicans are sick of the GOP Establishment

(AP) Republican voters view Donald Trump as their strongest general election candidate, according to an Associated Press-GfK poll that highlights the sharp contrast between the party’s voters and its top professionals regarding the billionaire businessman’s ultimate political strength.

Seven in 10 Republican and Republican-leaning registered voters say Trump could win in November 2016 if he is nominated, and that’s the most who say so of any candidate. By comparison, 6 in 10 say the same for retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, who, like Trump, has tapped into the powerful wave of antiestablishment anger defining the early phases of the 2016 contest.

“It’s the lifelong establishment politicians on both sides that rub me the wrong way,” said registered Republican Joe Selig, a 60-year-old carpenter from Vallejo, California. “I think Trump is more electable. He’s strong. We need strength these days.”

Republican voters are sick and tired of the GOP establishment, which makes lots of promises, then fails to keep them. They’re more than willing to concede the high ground to Democrats on a constant basis. Their plans have been failures. There’s nothing wrong with working across party lines (something Democrats have been refusing to do), but there is something wrong with giving Democrats Rolls Royce’s and getting Pinto’s for the GOP.

Of course, it is one thing to win the primary; it’s another to win the general

Experienced political strategists note that winning a general election and winning the Republican nomination are often very different tasks. The GOP’s most conservative voters — a group that is older and whiter than the nation as a whole — wield extraordinary influence in picking the nominee. Independents, moderate voters and minorities are far more important in general elections that draw many more people to the polls.

While Trump and Carson are popular in primary election polls, both have used divisive rhetoric in recent months that alienated some minorities. Trump called Mexican immigrants rapists and criminals during his announcement speech; while Carson said he would not support a Muslim presidential candidate.

“Republicans think (Democrat) Hillary (Rodham Clinton) is weaker than she is. They are wrong,” said GOP operative Katie Packer, who was deputy campaign manager for 2012 Republican nominee Mitt Romney. “They think we don’t need to win more women or more Hispanics to win. They’re wrong.”

How’d that work out for Romney? Anyhow, the comments by Trump and Carson are being distorted and are incomplete. We know it, and the media knows it, and the media knows that most voters won’t bother to learn the truth. GOP voters are tired of the squishy candidates who won’t go on the offensive. Neither McCain nor Romney really took it to Obama. Carson and Trump would. So would Carly Fiorina. Would Cruz, Rubio, or Jeb!? And there is quite a bit in Hillary’s background to attack. So, Democrats shouldn’t think it will be a cakewalk.

Is The Donald the best candidate for the GOP? Not in my opinion. I like some of his policy positions, hate others. I just don’t trust him. I’d trust Hillary less.

Crossed at Pirate’s Cove. Follow me on Twitter @WilliamTeach.

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