Pussification Hits MLB

The ongoing pussification of the NFL is getting serious. It is spreading to baseball:

A busy day of meetings that will result in significant differences in the way baseball games will be governed on the field was capped off Wednesday with an announcement that the Playing Rules Committee has voted overwhelmingly to outlaw home-plate collisions between runners and catchers.

Just how do they intend to do that? The chairman of the committee, Mets GM Sandy Alderson, vaguely explains:

“I think ultimately what we want to do is change the culture of acceptance that these plays are ordinary and routine and an accepted part of the game, that the risks and individual risks, the costs associated in terms of health and injury just no longer warrant the status quo.”

The professional term for this is general pussification, which has already led to the asinine practice of warning both benches when someone is hit by a pitch.

What the anti-collision crusade will mean in practical terms:

Enforcement will be two-fold. A runner who is deemed to have intentionally run over the catcher may be called out, for example, even if he touches the plate without being tagged. There can also be further penalties in terms of fines and ejections.

Get ready to howl with rage when close plays at the plate are decided by how good the catcher is at hamming it up when the runner unavoidably touches him.

Coming soon: Nerf baseballs, so that if there is ever another overpaid ‘roidster like Jose Conseco, it won’t hurt so much when the ball bounces off the top of his head and into the stands for a homerun.

That’s got to hurt.

On tips from Varla and Shawn R. Cross-posted at Moonbattery.

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