Basketball player Lauren Hill dies at age 19 in college after bravely fighting cancer

Basketball player Lauren Hill dies at age 19 in college after bravely fighting cancer

cancer

Lauren Hill before and after her treatment for Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma, a rare childhood brain cancer.

Someday, we will probably solve the evil that is cancer. But until then, it has taken many a life all too early. Such is the case with basketball player Lauren Hill, who almost did not get to play at the collegiate level because of creeping brain cancer. Good people stepped in and the NCAA pushed up the game schedule to allow her to play four games for Mount St. Joseph.

The Daily Mail reports,

College basketball player Lauren Hill lost her battle with cancer on Friday morning, aged just 19.

The Indiana native, who was diagnosed with a rare form of brain cancer shortly after her 18th birthday, had defied doctors’ expectations after they told her that she would not live past December.

Instead, she played four games with her team at Mount St. Joseph University in Cincinnati and raised more than $1.5 million for research into the cancer, Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma.

But as her condition worsened, she became an honorary coach and earlier this year, she moved to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, where she passed away on Friday morning.

Just a year and a half ago, Hill was just another high school student getting ready for college after she decided to play basketball at Mount St. Joseph.

A few weeks later, she started experiencing dizziness while playing for her high school team in nearby Lawrenceburg, Indiana.

Tests found the tumor and she was told that she had less than two years left.

But in September, doctors told her she wouldn’t make it past December – and after years as a standout high school basketball player, Hill’s hopes of playing college ball were put in jeopardy.

But the NCAA granted permission to move the school’s opening game forward because of her worsening condition, and on November 2, she realized her dream of playing for the school.

She scored the first and last baskets of the team’s 66-55 victory over Hiram College.

‘It’s a dream come true,’ she said. ‘To play on a college court, to put my foot down on the floor and hear the roar of the crowd – I just love it so much. I love basketball.

‘Everything that happened today was amazing. I’m truly happy, it’s a really good day.’

She spent the rest of her young life raising awareness about the rare cancer, which has a less than 10 percent survival rate, affecting mostly younger children. The U.S. Basketball Writers Association voted her the Pat Summitt Most Courageous Award, and she was featured on a box of Wheaties, the breakfast of champions. It was incredibly unselfish of her to spend the remaining time she had on this earth trying to raise money for research to help others. She could have spent her final days partying and taking exotic vacations, but instead this teenager chose to help others. What an incredible testimony and our thoughts and prayers go out to her family. Watch her make a basket in the video below.

Rachel Alexander

Rachel Alexander

Rachel Alexander is the editor of Intellectual Conservative. She is a senior editor at The Stream, and is a regular contributor to Townhall, the Selous Foundation for Public Policy Research, and The Christian Post, and provides weekend news items for Right Wing News. She frequently appears on TV and news radio as a conservative commentator. She is a recovering attorney and former gun magazine editor. She previously served as a former Assistant Attorney General for the State of Arizona, corporate attorney for Go Daddy Software, and Special Assistant/Deputy County Attorney for the Maricopa County Attorney's Office. As co-president of the UW Political Science Honor Society, she obtained degrees in Political Science and History from the University of Washington, followed by a law degree from Boston College and the University of Arizona. She was ranked by Right Wing News as one of the 50 Best Conservative Columnists from 2011-2016.

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