The Downside of Apollo 11

A lot of airtime has been appropriately devoted to the historic accomplishment of 40 years ago, when Americans became the first to walk on the moon. What could be more symbolic of the greatness of a country that believes in itself and strives to overcome all challenges, rather than wallowing in victim mentality and self-recrimination?

Unfortunately, there was one downside to this giant leap for mankind. As arguably the biggest news story in our planet’s history, it drowned out coverage of a degenerate Senator who killed a young girl.

On July 18, 1969, two days before Apollo 11 touched down on the moon, an evidently drunken Ted Kennedy drove his mom’s Olds 88 into the drink, leaving young Mary Jo Kopechne inside to drown. Though he had ample opportunity to pull her from the car, and to call emergency services, he did not report the incident until the next day, after he had a chance to talk with his lawyer and friends about how to deal with Mary Jo’s inconvenient corpse.

Meanwhile, fishermen had discovered the submerged Oldsmobile. A diver was called, who found the dead girl’s body in a spot where an air bubble would have formed. He concluded:

Had I received a call within five to ten minutes of the accident occurring, and was able, as I was the following morning, to be at the victim’s side within twenty-five minutes of receiving the call, in such event there is a strong possibility that she would have been alive on removal from the submerged car.

In short, the sleazy Senator was clearly guilty of manslaughter. Given the media attention you would expect from such a sensational case, this should have been enough to end his political career, even in Massachusetts. But possibly due in part to the excitement of Apollo 11, the appalling incident never sufficiently penetrated the public consciousness. The drunken, irresponsible, self-centered killer went on to become what his fellow moonbats sometimes describe as “The Conscience of the Senate.”

ted kennedy
The liberal concept of conscience personified.

On tips from The MaryHunter and Rick L. Cross-posted at Moonbattery.

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