The ‘Ransom-Note Method,’ explained

With a special shout-out to David Brooks and the Crapweasel Coalition:

Here’s a clue for the youngsters: If the New York Times ever offers to publish you, you’re doing something wrong.
It is cowardly punks like David Brooks, and all their sorry crapweasel imitators, who make the Ransom Note Method such an effective weapon for liberals. What has become known as “the 11th Commandment” — Thou shalt speak no ill of a fellow Republican — is usually, and wrongly, attributed to Ronald Reagan, and it is also widely misunderstood.
The 11th Commandment was actually coined by California state Republican Party chairman Gaylord Parkinson during the 1966 GOP gubernatorial primary. Parkinson had seen how, during the fight for the 1964 Republican presidential nomination, the milquetoast moderate opponents of Barry Goldwater had done the Democrats’ dirty work for them, by labeling Goldwater a radical warmongering demagogue. Thus, once Goldwater won the nomination, all LBJ’s henchmen had to do was to repeat the accusation: “Barry Goldwater is a paranoid wacko extremist — as even his fellow Republicans agree!”
David Brooks is not a candidate for public office and is therefore not covered by the 11th Commandment. Thus to denounce him is no sin and, as a neutral objective professional journalist, my first obligation is to the write The Truth: David Brooks is a crapweasel

Please consider yourself invited to read the whole thing.

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