Bunkering Down in the Bluest of Blue States

From yesterday afternoon: “Kamala Harris wins attorney general’s race as Steve Cooley concedes.” (At Memeorandum and Crooks and Liars, where folks are thrilled with Harris’ radicalism.)

Democrats have now won every single statewide race. Some might recall that I’ve contemplated leaving California, although that’s entirely impossible at this point. I’ll no doubt be having continuing thoughts on this, unless something improves soon, which is unlikely. A poll out a couple of weeks ago was no consolation. I’ll be down in the bunker if you need me. From the Los Angeles Times:

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The road to redemption for the Republican Party in California may be even rougher than November’s statewide electoral drubbing indicated, as a new Los Angeles Times/USC poll shows a deep reluctance among many voters to side with a GOP candidate and broad swaths of the state holding views on government’s role that conflict with Republican tenets.

California voters surveyed in the poll repudiated the party’s stance on illegal immigration by endorsing a host of positions intended to make it easier for the undocumented to gain legal status. Their support for same-sex marriage outnumbered that opposing any legal recognition by more than 3 to 1. Californians also endorsed an assertive role for government in protecting minority citizens, regulating corporations and helping the poor and needy, and rejected arguments that an activist role for government had harmed the fiber of American society.

The negative overlay both explained and helped determine the fates of the party’s candidates in November. As a GOP tide swept the nation, Republicans here lost all statewide offices, with one contest, for attorney general, still unresolved but leaning toward the Democrat. Republicans here also failed to gain any congressional seats and lost a legislative seat.

Strikingly, almost one in five California voters said they would never cast a ballot for a Republican. Among Latinos, that rose to almost one in three. Only 5% of California voters were as emphatically anti-Democrat.

“I don’t know how any Republican thinks they can win in California after looking at this,” said GOP pollster Linda DiVall, who with Democratic pollster Stanley Greenberg directed the survey for The Times and the USC College of Letters, Arts & Sciences.

The party faces a critical collision between its own voters, a minority in California, and those it needs to attract to win. The most faithful Republicans this year – those who voted for both Meg Whitman for governor and Carly Fiorina for Senate – said by a 27-point margin that to be more successful, Republicans should nominate “true conservatives.”

But among the majority of voters who spurned Whitman and Fiorina in November – and in whose good graces any future winning candidate would need to be – the results were reversed. Forty-three percent said that future Republican candidates needed to be more moderate. Only 20% said that Republicans should nominate “true conservatives.”

As those figures help illustrate, the GOP’s difficulties in California rest on two overlapping conflicts, ideological and demographic. The party’s conservative primary voters determine nominees, even if their views are often opposite those of the far more moderate general election audience. And the party’s white and conservative voter base is increasingly giving way to the state’s non-white and nonpartisan population.

RTWT.

Related: At Michelle’s, “DREAM Act nightmare: 2.1 million future Democrat voter recruitment drive.”

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