Excerpt Of The Day: Hurtgen Forest And The War On Terror

“During World War II, U.S. and German forces fought the battle of Hurtgen Forest. It began Sept. 19, 1944 and ended Feb. 10, 1945. That was one battle in a strategically insignificant corridor of barely 50 square miles east of the Belgium-Germany border. The Germans inflicted more than 24,000 casualties on American forces, while another 9,000 Americans were sidelined due to illness, fatigue and friendly fire. Had live TV beamed this battle to America, there might have been an outcry that the policy was failing and somehow a cease-fire and an accommodation with Hitler should be achieved.

America won that war because the objective wasn’t to understand the Nazis, or to reach an accommodation with them; the objective was to win the war. Anything less in this war – against an equally evil and unrelenting enemy – will mean defeat for the United States and for freedom everywhere. That’s what Rumsfeld was getting at when he said, “We can persevere in Iraq or we can withdraw prematurely, until they force us to make a stand nearer home. But make no mistake: They are not going to give up, whether we acquiesce in their immediate demands or not.”

Rumsfeld is right.” — Cal Thomas

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