Q&A Friday #32: What Does The Hamas Win Mean For Israel And The Palestinians?

Questions: “Now that Hamas is in control of the Palestinian government, what are the chances that a major conflict will break out between Israel and Palestine?” — Son_of_Toejam on 2006-01-26 07:17:20

“Hamas v Fatah. Is there a difference? Will the US State Department continue to throw money at them?” — BIG

“Now that the Palestinian people have elected Hamas and chosen a course of violence against Israel, is there such a thing as collateral damage from Israel’s forthcoming response?

(What I mean is, do the people of Palestine now deserve to suffer the consequences for the choice that they have made?)” — bjlillo

“Can Israel accept a Gaza strip governed by what is effectively an Iranian controlled organization, Hamas?

Or, are we likely to see Israel pull the plug on the idea of an emerging Palestinian state and reoccupy Gaza City?” — CoolCzech

Answer: Overall, the fact that Hamas won is probably a positive overall because it’s going to help kill so many of the myths about the Palestinians that have become, “common knowledge.”

Myth #1: The Palestinians want peace & there’s a peace agreement right around the corner. Obviously, that’s not true because the Pals just came out at the polls and handed a big victory to a bunch of genocidal terrorists whose openly stated goal is to wipe out Israel.

Myth #2: The Palestinian government is trying to stop terrorism. There have been temporary ceasefires where the terrorists catch a breather and rearm, but neither Arafat nor Abbas made any genuine effort to stop terrorism and Hamas certainly isn’t going to do it.

Myth #3: The Palestinian government shouldn’t be held responsible for terrorist attacks. If a government of a country allows a group of terrorists to make attacks on another country, without making a good faith effort to stop them, then they are as responsible for those attacks as if they’d ordered them. Now that Hamas is actually in the government, the Israelis can treat acts of terrorism as acts of war, as they should have all along.

Granted, anti-semites and some of the people, whose capacity for self-delusion is practically endless, are still not going to wake up, even with Hamas in charge, but a lot of people will.

Hopefully, having Hamas in charge will be such a jolt to the international community, Israel, and the US, that they’ll stop giving the bloodthirsty savages in the disputed territories a free pass and start requiring them to act like civilized human beings in order to get aid, political support, and sympathy.

Furthermore, this is probably good news for Israel. They have new options available to them militarily since the Palestinian government can now be held directly responsible for terrorist attacks. There will be less international support for the Palestinians, Hamas will be put under considerable pressure to moderate their stand against Israel, and maybe support for transferring the Palestinians to the surrounding countries will pick up, even if that’s still not likely at this point.

Now, in order:

“Now that Hamas is in control of the Palestinian government, what are the chances that a major conflict will break out between Israel and Palestine?”

Not much higher than they were with Fatah in charge.

“Hamas v Fatah. Is there a difference? Will the US State Department continue to throw money at them?”

I tend to think we’ll find ways to give them money that doesn’t go through the government. Sort of like what we did with Afghanistan back when the Taliban was in charge.

“Now that the Palestinian people have elected Hamas and chosen a course of violence against Israel, is there such a thing as collateral damage from Israel’s forthcoming response?

(What I mean is, do the people of Palestine now deserve to suffer the consequences for the choice that they have made?)”

Yes, the Palestinians deserve what they get.

“Can Israel accept a Gaza strip governed by what is effectively an Iranian controlled organization, Hamas?

Or, are we likely to see Israel pull the plug on the idea of an emerging Palestinian state and reoccupy Gaza City?”

Netanyahu was a big opponent of moving out of the strip and if he gets in during the next election, they might reverse course in some form or fashion, but the genie is out of the bottle now. What, are they going to take all the people they just moved and set them back up? Somehow, I doubt the Israeli people would go for that.

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