Rewarding Criminals For Fleeing The Police?

Only in America (or, come to think of it, maybe Britain) could this moronic criminal actually have a chance to be win a lawsuit because he was hurt while running from the cops:

“The nocturnal chase began near Atlanta after a deputy sheriff clocked Victor Harris driving 73 miles per hour in a 55 mph zone and turned on the siren. Harris sped off, weaving past other cars and going through red lights.

He turned into a parking lot, hit the cruiser of another deputy, Timothy Scott, and sped back on the highway. Scott pursued Harris, then slammed into Harris’ car to stop him. The car went down an embankment, crashed and left Harris, then 19, a quadriplegic.

In a nationally watched case heard Monday by the Supreme Court, Harris sued Scott for violating his Fourth Amendment right against unreasonable seizures. He said Scott was wrong to use such an extreme maneuver when Harris’ only wrongdoing was speeding.

Harris won in an early stage of his lawsuit in which the lower court said deputy sheriff Scott could be held personally liable for Harris’ injuries. Scott’s lawyer is asking the justices to reverse an appeals court decision that said Scott lacked grounds to believe Harris posed a threat of serious harm to others.

The high court’s decision could broadly affect the rules for police chasing fleeing suspects.

…Craig Jones, for Harris, argued that if the court applies that standard merely to a person’s driving, it would be easier for police to defend using deadly force and “to literally take out anyone who is speeding.”

Jones insisted Harris never lost control of the car until it was hit. “He only crossed the center line to pass and when he passed, he used his turn signal,” Jones said.”

So, this guy ran from the cops, was weaving in and out of traffic at a high rate of speed, running redlights, hit another cruiser, and he’s supposed to be the victim here? Keep in mind, folks, this guy has ALREADY WON in a lower court.

How did he win? That’s a bit baffling, since whatever you may think of ramming his car off the road, it certainly doesn’t seem to be a form of “unreasonable seizure.” Maybe he won in the previous court because he ended up as a 19 year-old quadriplegic and they said, “Forget the law, we feel sorry for him, so he wins.” Hopefully, that won’t be how it turns out in the Supreme Court.

While it is easy to feel sorry for Harris, he brought his injuries on himself with his behavior. By fleeing from the police in his car, through traffic, he was putting other people’s lives in extreme jeopardy and the job of the police is to stop that sort of behavior. It’s a shame that Harris was injured, but better him than some innocent he might have crashed into or knocked off the road.

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