The Day We Decide

One thing I love about twitter is that you can find some great blogs that you never would have found otherwise. Yesterday I found Random Alien Musings. I noticed this post on MLK called “Livin’ The Dream.” I thought I would share his thoughts. Kunta Evans has this to say about his black community:

The day we decide that no political party will hold sway over us and tell us we need the gov’t to intervene on our behalf will be the day that changes our current destiny. The day we decide to collectively commit to thinking for ourselves without regard to petty partisan politics and culturally accepted schools of thought will be the day when history will be made. The day we decide that we aren’t entitled to a handout or owed something by the gov’t or any other entity will be the day that changes our current trajectory. The day we decide to expect greatness from ourselves because we feel like that’s a reasonable expectation for us, the day Black men decide to collectively step up and deliver the goods for their families the way they were created to will be the day not only the Black race, but the world will be better off.

The only thing I would add to that is that almost all that he wrote applies to every American of any color.

The government will never make us better. The government will never make us happy or prosperous. The most profound sentence in Kunta’s essay is where he writes, “The day we decide to expect greatness from ourselves because we feel like that’s a reasonable expectation for us..” Each one of us has a calling and a purpose. We need only to find it within ourselves.

Several years ago Tom Brokaw wrote a book called, “The Greatest Generation.” It was about the men and women who grew up during the Depression, and went on to fight World War II. Brokaw says of them, “It is, I believe, the greatest generation any society has ever produced.” Why? Because they suffered hardship, fought a terrible war, and came back to America to rebuilt it into a superpower. They were hardworking, determined, self made men and women who got up every day ready to do their job the best they could. A generation of incredible people of all colors, that stood up to terrible things, and overcame them. They lived through depression and the war. They didn’t give up. They moved forward. They came back from all that, worked hard, and made America great.

What is important in the book is how each of them helped the other. Not necessarily in a phyiscal sense, but they were there for one another. I think this is maybe what we have forgotten. Do we reach out to one another? Do we take care of our family? Extended family? Do we help another person in our daily lives? Do we listen? Do we understand?

The greatest generation went through terrible things together, and came out of it strong and ready to work hard. We need that feeling today. We need to depend on one another, not the government. Instead, we fight and argue about the government and politics. We waste our time not caring about each other.

The day we decide to care for one another, is when things really will change.

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