The other 79% are too stunned to come up with a snarky headline.

Rasmussen: Only 21% Say U.S. Government Has Consent of the Governed:

The founding document of the United States, the Declaration of Independence, states that governments derive “their just powers from the consent of the governed.” Today, however, just 21% of voters nationwide believe that the federal government enjoys the consent of the governed.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 61% disagree and say the government does not have the necessary consent. Eighteen percent (18%) of voters are not sure.

Questions: did they poll people with any understanding of U.S. civics? Anybody who’s voted at any time in the past? Did they check, to make sure the respondents know we live in a representative democracy?

And if so, what the hell?

Maybe this:

Seventy-one percent (71%) of all voters now view the federal government as a special interest group, and 70% believe that the government and big business typically work together in ways that hurt consumers and investors.

Well, then, that’s all the more reason to take power away from that “special interest,” isn’t it?

More:

That helps explain why 75% of voters are angry at the policies of the federal government, and 63% say it would be better for the country if most members of Congress are defeated this November.

I wonder how those numbers compare to past polls. I mean, everybody’s always mad at the government, aren’t they? But: usually, people hate Congress, but love their own Congressman. Not anymore:

Just 27% believe their own representative in Congress is the best person for the job.

Well, count me among the other 73%. But then, I live in Rep. Tammy Baldwin’s district. One of Congress’ most liberal members.

Now, if I lived in Rep. Paul Ryan’s district…

This part was interesting:

Those who earn more than $100,000 a year are more narrowly divided on the question, but those with lower incomes overwhelming reject the notion that today’s government has the consent from which to derive its just authority. Those with the lowest incomes are the most skeptical.

I find that a little counterintuitive, because it’s the people with the lowest incomes who derive the most direct benefit from the government.

Or maybe it’s not counterintuitive at all: maybe those at the lower end of the economic scale feel they should be benefiting more. Maybe they believe it’s the power of the “special interests” that’s preventing them from getting more.

If so, that’s a sad state of affairs.

Previously:

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