Two Academy Members Admit Voting for “12 Years a Slave” Without Even Seeing It

Two Academy Members Admit Voting for “12 Years a Slave” Without Even Seeing It

Apparently, the Oscars is a sort of affirmative-action program these days, bestowing awards on actors and films that the Academy members think need a boost. Two Academy Members admit to not even watching “12 Years a Slave” before voting for it for Best Picture.

oscars

What’s the point of hosting an awards show for acting and film-making if the winners are picked for political reasons?

If you were watching the Oscars on Sunday night, you no doubt saw Steve McQueen’s film: 12 Years A Slavetake the Best Picture prize. But two Academy members: revealed to the L.A. Times: that they didn’t even see it, claiming that it would be an uncomfortable film for them to watch.

Instead, they voted for it because of the relevance and importance the film, which is a real-life, harrowing account of Solomon Northup’s years as a free man captured and sold into slavery in the South.

There’s no mention of the two Academy members’ race. However, the Oscars have become a vehicle for white liberals to prove how progressive they are by making a big to-do of bestowing awards on black people. In 2002, Julia Roberts kept telling reporters she didn’t want to live in a world where Denzel Washington hadn’t won an Oscar–then squealed “I love my life!” when he got it, as if he had won thanks to her assistance. It was all about her.

How condescending. Black actors and directors can compete just fine on their own, although the Academy seems to disagree.

Also see: 10 Musicians Who Should Be Blacklisted by Conservatives

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