Voter ID and Your Kitchen Sink

A few days ago a friend forwarded me an email she received from MoveOn.org.:  The email was in response to South Carolina’s attempt to change their voting laws, recently struck down by the Department of Justice.:  In a tone of sheer panic, the good people of MoveOn.org begged for money because South Carolina wants to require voters to show ID at the polls.

MoveOn.org’s apocalyptic prediction was that by requiring voters to show photo IDs, Republicans would “steal” the elections, because the “laws shamelessly target key segments of the Obama coalition from 2008, including first-time voters, poor people, and people of color, and could easily tip a close election to Mitt Romney or whoever the Republican nominee is.”:  They even went so far as to call it “the most sweeping attack on voting rights since Jim Crow.”

I couldn’t help but wonder why they are so panicked over this ID law, but not others.

Earlier this month, Illinois passed a law requiring consumers to present a photo ID in order to buy Drano. Yet, MoveOn.org has remained silent.:  The government is limiting poor people’s access to Drano, while George Soros’ people just sit by idly.:  They don’t care about all the clogged kitchen sinks that will eventually get so bad, those poor people will have to leave their homes.:  Where is the MoveOn.org email asking me to send them money because of the homelessness this law could cause? After all, we can’t expect a poor person, who can’t even afford an ID, to be able to pay a plumber $75 to come unclog a drain.

And, what about other ID laws, like needing to show an ID to buy Claritin-D or Sudafed?:  MoveOn.org has never been concerned about all the poor people, Latinos, and African Americans walking around with stuffed up noses and no way to unstuff them.:  They want poor people to have free health care, so long as that free health care doesn’t include Zyrtec.:  Don’t all people, regardless of race or class, deserve relief from seasonal allergies?

By requiring an ID, poor people are also being denied their constitutional right to bear arms.: :  They can’t cash a check, open a bank account, buy cigarettes, drive a car, get on an airplane, or, in most states, apply for government programs like welfare or food stamps.:  That’s a lot of discrimination.

Perhaps MoveOn.org is only concerned with voting laws.:  If so, many states have election laws that no one can buy or serve alcohol until after the polls close.:  Isn’t that voter discrimination against alcoholics who can’t function without a drink?:  How do you expect someone to get to the polls when they are suffering through detox because of oppressive laws?:  Alcoholism is a mental illness–shouldn’t MoveOn.org be asking what group of the mentally ill will be disenfranchised next?

Instead, MoveOn.org is only concerned with ID laws meant to prevent voter fraud and protect our elections.:  MoveOn.org is shocked that a state would want to have the same requirements for voting as they have for buying Sudafed, while yawning at Black Panthers, holding night sticks, standing outside the polls to intimidate voters.

In my home state of Kentucky, the new Secretary of State, Alison Lundergan Grimes agrees with MoveOn.org.:  She even ran on voter ID laws, using her grandma in her commercials.:  Apparently, Granny doesn’t have an ID, and Grimes needs to protect her right to vote.

I drive my husband’s 79-year-old grandmother to the polls every election year (even though her votes usually just cancel out mine).:  I would have no problem driving her to get an ID, and even paying for it if needed.:  Maybe Grimes could do the same for her grandmother.:  That seems like a much quicker, easier way to protect her grandma’s right to vote than running a costly SoS campaign.

Perhaps MoveOn.org could start a charity providing IDs for the people with whom it seems so concerned.:  Or, they could push for a law where states provide them one for free.:  That’s one government welfare program I can get behind.

Unfortunately for them, I am not going to send MoveOn.org any money to stop laws like South Carolina’s.:  However, I would consider sending them money if it went towards handing out free augers to all those poor people with clogged up sinks.

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