Which Is More Dangerous? Philadelphia Or Iraq?

If you’re a young, black American, would you be safer serving in Iraq or walking the mean streets of the city of Brotherly Love? The answer may surprise you:

“Between March 21, 2003, when the first military death was recorded in Iraq, and March 31, 2006, there were 2,321 deaths among American troops in Iraq. Seventy-nine percent were a result of action by hostile forces. Troops spent a total of 592,002 “person-years” in Iraq during this period. The ratio of deaths to person-years, .00392, or 3.92 deaths per 1,000 person-years, is the death rate of military personnel in Iraq.

How does this rate compare with that in other groups? One meaningful comparison is to the civilian population of the United States. That rate was 8.42 per 1,000 in 2003, more than twice that for military personnel in Iraq.

The comparison is imperfect, of course, because a much higher fraction of the American population is elderly and subject to higher death rates from degenerative diseases. The death rate for U.S. men ages 18 to 39 in 2003 was 1.53 per 1,000 — 39 percent of that of troops in Iraq. But one can also find something equivalent to combat conditions on home soil. The death rate for African American men ages 20 to 34 in Philadelphia was 4.37 per 1,000 in 2002, 11 percent higher than among troops in Iraq. Slightly more than half the Philadelphia deaths were homicides.

The death rate of American troops in Vietnam was 5.6 times that observed in Iraq.”

Despite everything we’ve heard about, “breaking the military,” and how we can’t sustain the sort of losses we’ve taken in Iraq, the truth is that our losses have been extremely light. That’s certainly no consolation if you’ve had a friend or relative killed fighting for freedom in Iraq, but it does show you how negative and warped the mainstream media’s coverage of Iraq has been.

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