Moonbat Tech: Pedal-Powered Porsche


In its never-ending quest for new extremes of self-parody, the enviromoonbat movement has applied Fred Flintstone-era technology to sports cars:

ferdinand-porsche-911-gt3-rs-1.jpg

There’s a reason the wheels look a little thin. The engineless vehicle has the same propulsion mechanism as a tricycle.

Only one of its kind, the vehicle is dubbed the Ferdinand. Unfortunately, this Porsche 911 GT3 RS is also the slowest one sans fun but only serious concerns at the core. Representing everything that will never happen to a Porsche, under the skin there is a collection of tubes, tape, two pedals and a drivetrain that makes this unique vehicle weigh only 100 pounds. Other than these, the rims that are a nice piece of optical illusion are merely a few centimeters wide and there is no rumbling in the boxer four-wheeler as you have to provide the thrust. The vehicle is silent, has no emissions and almost no running costs.

No emissions? They’re forgetting that the Supreme Court has declared CO2 — which will be copiously exhaled by anyone trying to pedal the Ferdinand up a hill — to be a pollutant subject to suppression by the EPA. The only truly ecofriendly vehicle is one that has no human beings in it. Having no passengers would also lighten the vehicle. After removing the engine, it’s the next logical step. No doubt Government Motors already has people-free cars on the drawing board.

Wow, watch it go.

On a tip from Air2air. Cross-posted at Moonbattery.

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