Can “Extreme Weather” Cause Tectonic Movement?

Can “Extreme Weather” Cause Tectonic Movement?

(Comments now open. Something went goofy while posting using iPhone after it missed it’s scheduled posting time)

Why, yes, they are still pushing this

People who are ridiculed for saying that earthquakes are a result of global warming could actually be right, scientists claim.

Long-term climate change has the potential to spin Earth’s tectonic plates, according to a news study from the Australian National University.

Working with researchers in Germany and France, they have established a link between the motion of the Indian plate over the last ten million years and the intensification of Indian monsoons.

Hmm, so, that kinda leaves less than 100 years of industrialization out of the causation mix.

The scientists put information into a computer that indicated how monsoons had eroded the eastern Himalayas over the last ten million years.

They discovered that enough rocks were worn away from the eastern side of the plate to account for the plate’s anti-clockwise movement.

Tell me more

‘Now we know that the opposite holds as well: long-term climate change, or the natural changes in climate patterns over millions of years, can modify the motion of plates in a feedback mechanism.’

So, weather that has been going on for ten million years can affect plate tectonics. Good to know. And, the actual substance of the story completely blows away the premise of the stories headline and first paragraph. Alarmists=#notwinning.

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