NY Times: “How are cops supposed to know who the good guy or the bad guy is with the gun?”

It’s a new year, so, the NY Times Editorial Board uses the occassion to pimp gun control with their usual flavor of hysteria

Two Ways of Dealing With Guns

This is a big day for Texans yearning to flaunt their handguns in belt and shoulder holsters. A new “open carry” law enacted by the Republican Legislature goes into effect on Friday, posing a challenge for law enforcement, businesses and other institutions that are understandably wary of how social interchange will be affected.

Got that? Flaunt their handguns. Does this apply to women who arm themselves to provide protection from assault and rape? Men average 50% higher strength than women. Men are 15 to 20% bigger. Do the NY Times and their Progressive supporters not want to allow women to protect themselves? Why do they hate women?

It’s also a big day in Seattle, where the City Council’s new “gun violence tax” takes effect, levying a $25 charge on each gun sold and an ammunition tax of 2 to 5 cents per round. The law was upheld in December by a county judge, who found it did not interfere with the right to bear arms and was a legitimate tax to finance gun violence research and help pay for its costly effects. If it survives appeal by the gun lobby, the taxation route deserves to be widely used as a tactic in battling the gun menace.

Boy, that should be a big roadblock to criminals, who tend not to purchase guns and ammo from regular gun shows.

The contrasting developments in Texas and Seattle demonstrate politicians’ tug of war over gun rights and civilian safety, which the gun lobby has been manipulating by pushing through state laws that block local governments from enacting needed ordinances. The resulting crazy quilt of clashing interests demonstrates the need for federal laws, which, of course, have been rejected by a Congress captive to the gun industry’s agenda.

How will taxes on guns and ammo provide safety? No one is ever able to provide a reason.

The effect of the industry’s power on local streets has the Houston police chief, Charles McClelland, worrying about how his officers will deal with openly armed citizens amid rising fears over mass shootings and terrorism. “How are they supposed to know who the good guy or the bad guy is with the gun?” he asks.

This is surely the favorite line for the Editorial Board, who surely think every civilian with a gun is a bad guy (and probably the police too. No word whether the armed security at the NY Times building are considered bad guys). But, hey, it’s pretty darned easy to know. The bad guy is the one whipping the gun out and pointing it at the police. The good guy is the one smiling at the police, wishing them a good day, and going about their business. The bad guy is the one hiding the gun under their very baggy shirt or jacket, or in a pocket. The good guy is the one confidently practicing their open carry capability in a holster. Interestingly, in almost every place that allows open carry (and concealed), those who are legally allowed aren’t shooting the streets up.

The confusion for the public can be considerable. A woman called 911 in Colorado Springs in October when she saw a man toting a weapon in the street. She was told the gunman had that right under the open-carry law. The man began a shooting spree outside her door and randomly murdered three innocent people.

Well, there you go, an obviously evil handgun carrier with nefarious intentions…oh, wait, the NYTEB forgot to tell us something, which we see at the provided link

On Halloween morning, Naomi Bettis called 911 to report a man with a long black rifle outside her home. The dispatcher asked her to describe what she saw.

Yeah, not a handgun. A rifle.

Crossed at Pirate’s Cove. Follow me on Twitter @WilliamTeach.

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